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Answered

The holiday days seem to be going into the next day as if that next day is also holiday.

Saul 3 years ago updated by Michael J. Radwin 9 months ago 1

The holiday days seem to be going into the next day as if that next day is also holiday.

This does not happen for candle lighting or havdalah.

1 Example ,The duration on outlook seems to be preset to 2 days. the event times goes from 10/9/2019 12:00am and ends 10/10/2109 12:00am . I would need to open the specific event "uncheck all day event" to correct this.

Answer

Answer
Answered

Hi Saul, thanks for being a long time Hebcal user and reporting this bug many years ago. 

We were finally able to reproduce this error on Outlook 365 web. We made two changes to our iCalendar feeds to fix the problem for you:

1. Our .ics feeds so they include X-MICROSOFT-CDO-ALLDAYEVENT:TRUE which according to some Microsoft documentation might fix the problem.

2. Our VTIMEZONE implementation for Asia/Jerusalem (the timezone that is used throughout Israel) has been modified so it only uses a simpler, current Daylight Saving Time rules (which clocks are advanced by one hour, beginning on the Friday before the last Sunday of March, and ending on the last Sunday of October). This is perfectly accurate for any calendars 2013 and later (when the Israeli government standardized and simplified DST rules).

Shana Tova!


    Answer
    Answered

    Hi Saul, thanks for being a long time Hebcal user and reporting this bug many years ago. 

    We were finally able to reproduce this error on Outlook 365 web. We made two changes to our iCalendar feeds to fix the problem for you:

    1. Our .ics feeds so they include X-MICROSOFT-CDO-ALLDAYEVENT:TRUE which according to some Microsoft documentation might fix the problem.

    2. Our VTIMEZONE implementation for Asia/Jerusalem (the timezone that is used throughout Israel) has been modified so it only uses a simpler, current Daylight Saving Time rules (which clocks are advanced by one hour, beginning on the Friday before the last Sunday of March, and ending on the last Sunday of October). This is perfectly accurate for any calendars 2013 and later (when the Israeli government standardized and simplified DST rules).

    Shana Tova!